First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday Intros: Wonder

First Chapter First Paragraph

Today I’m participating in First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday Intros, hosted by Diane at Bibliophile by the Sea, in which bloggers share a bit about a book they’re reading or planning to read soon.


With my “homeroom” students I am reading Wonder. We started reading several weeks ago, but we only see each other once a week. Due to testing for the last two weeks, we were together A LOT, so we got much further along in the book. This book is part of a community-wide project, and when our librarian presented this to my students she read the first page, which is also the first chapter. This project is also featured in our yearbook. The chapters are short, some being only a page or two. The first chapter reading piqued my interest, as well as my students’, so I’m going to share the full first chapter with you guys today. 

23302416Ordinary

I know I’m not an ordinary ten-year-old kid. I mean, sure I do ordinary things. I eat ice cream. I ride my bike. I play ball. I have an XBox. Stuff like that makes me ordinary. I guess. And I feel ordinary. Inside. But i know ordinary kids don’t make other ordinary kids run away screaming in playgrounds. I know ordinary kids don’t get started at wherever they go.

If I found found a magic lamp and I could have one wish, I would wish that I had a normal face that no one ever noticed at all. I would wish that I could walk down the street without people seeing me and then doing that look-away thing. Here’s what I think: the only reason I’m not ordinary is that no one else seems me that way.

But I’m kind of used to how I look by now. I know how to pretend I don’t see the faces people make. We’ve all gotten pretty good at that sort of thing: me, Mom and Dad, Via. Actually, I take that back: Via’s not so good at it. She can get really annoyed when people do something rude. Like, for instance, one time in the playground some older kids made some noises. I don’t even know what the noises were exactly because I didn’t hear them myself, but Via heard them and she just started yelling at the kids. That’s the way she is. I’m not that way.

Via doesn’t see me as ordinary. She says she does, but if I were ordinary, she wouldn’t feel like she needs to protect me as much. And Mom and Dad don’t see me as ordinary, either. They see me was extraordinary. I think the only person in the world who realizes how ordinary I am is me.

My name is August, by the way. I won’t describe what I look like. Whatever you’re thinking, it’s probably worse.


Synopsis:

You can’t blend in when you were born to stand out.

My name is August. I won’t describe what I look like. Whatever you’re thinking, it’s probably worse.

August Pullman wants to be an ordinary ten-year-old. He does ordinary things. He eats ice cream. He plays on his Xbox. He feels ordinary – inside.

But Auggie is far from ordinary. Ordinary kids don’t make other ordinary kids run away screaming in playgrounds. Ordinary kids don’t get stared at wherever they go.

Born with a terrible facial abnormality, Auggie has been home-schooled by his parents his whole life, in an attempt to protect him from the cruelty of the outside world. Now, for the first time, he’s being sent to a real school – and he’s dreading it. All he wants is to be accepted – but can he convince his new classmates that he’s just like them, underneath it all?

Narrated by Auggie and the people around him whose lives he touches forever, Wonder is a funny, frank, astonishingly moving debut to read in one sitting, pass on to others, and remember long after the final page.


Would you keep reading?  What do you think of August’s feelings? Would you have been his friend in middle school? How do you feel about these type of situations now as an adult?

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3 thoughts on “First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday Intros: Wonder

  1. I would definitely keep reading. This sounds like a very worthwhile read. Given the type of kid I was in middle school, I imagine I would be his friend. It’s the type of person I have always been–a bit of an outsider myself and drawn to others on the outside looking in. Even then it wasn’t about what someone looked like that mattered to me. It was who they were on the inside.

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