Review: All Scot and Bothered

Title: All Scott and Bothered
Author: Kerrigan Byrne
Publisher: St. Martin’s Paperbacks
Release Date: September 2020
Length: 416 pages
Series?: Devil You Know #2
Genre: Historical Romance

He is first and foremost—at everything. A man who’s made his own way in the world through ruthless cunning and sheer force of will. A strong and imposing Scot who can turn on the charm but does not suffer fools. His title: Lord Chief Justice of the High Court. His name: Cassius Gerard Ramsay. His mission: To investigate the goings-on at London’s most notorious gaming hell, owned and operated by one of the most intriguing and desirable women he’s ever met.

IN THIS GAME OF LOVE, THE RULES DO NOT APPLY

Cecelia Teague was an orphan facing a rather dire future—until a secret benefactor from her mother’s scandalous past swept into her life. Sent to prestigious boarding school and later to university, Cecelia believed high society was at her fingertips…Then, from out of nowhere, she became the inheritor of a gambling establishment. Now Cecelia must live two lives: one as a proper lady who finds herself undeniably drawn to Lord Ramsay and the other as a savvy gaming hell owner trying to save her business from the very same man. He has no idea she is both women…and Cecelia would like to keep it that way. But what happens when consuming passion and escalating danger threaten to reveal the truth?

Find the book: Goodreads | Amazon

This series revolves around three women: Alexandra, Cecelia, and Francesca. The trio call themselves the Red Rogues. Each book in the series can act as a standalone. The first book is Alexandra’s story. The second is Cecilia’s and the final book is Francesca’s.

Cecelia is a heroine to marvel. She is utter kindness and brilliance, even though she has very real fears. She endured a harsh childhood but revels in life as an adult.

Cecelia inherits a gambling establishment and decides, with the help of the Red Rogues, to turn her new home into a school for young girls. A haven to the girls whose fathers and brothers died on her own late husband’s ship. Because of her own background, Cecelia is adamant about supporting women and their rights, and this is her first step to do that.

Upon beginning this process of establishing her school, Cecelia’s overbearing neighbor, Cassius Ramsay (a chief justice) blazes into her home. This is not one of those “put your best foot forward” times. Cassius grossly miscalculates Cecelia and her purpose, but he makes it well-known that he is determined to bring hell upon one of the most notorious gaming halls. He was intimidating and scary, but Cecelia doesn’t cower.

The writing brings flawed characters, witty banter, and heated controversies. Cassius is a hard man, skeptical and wary. He stands in conviction that he is a man without fault.

Cecelia is struggling to understand all that she’s inherited from her aunt, including her role as The Scarlet Lady. She doesn’t know the full breadth of her aunt’s business dealings or anything about the villainous Crimson Council.

While Cassius is not entirely convinced about Cecelia or her school exploit, he does begin to see beyond his career. He almost takes it upon himself to become the protector and helper for Cecelia and the girls. Slowly, the pair build a foundation of trust with an overpowering sexy chemistry.

With Cassius’s role as a chief justice and his drive to bring down certain entities in town, things get convoluted when Cecelia gets mixed up in her ignorance of her aunt’s previous dealings. Cassius is bent on ending the kidnapping and sex trafficking, and both wind up tangling with the Crimson Council.

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