Feature Follow Friday (January 30)

Alison Can Read Feature & FollowIt is the Friday Feature Follow!

This is a weekly blog meme hosted by Parajunkee’s View and Alison Can Read.

Here are the general rules to Follow Friday:
1. Follow the Follow My Book Blog Friday Hosts (links above) and any one else you want to follow on the list
2. Follow our Featured Bloggers
3. Put your Blog name & URL in the Linky thing.
4. Grab the button up there and place it in a post, this post is for people to find a place to say hi in your comments
5. Follow Follow Follow as many as you can
6. If someone comments and says they are following you, be a dear and follow back. Spread the Love…and the followers
7. If you want to show the link list, just follow the link below the entries and copy and paste it within your post!
8. If your new to the follow Friday hop, comment and let me know, so I can stop by and check out your blog!
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The Question:

Hard print (real thing) or Kindle/Nook, which is your favorite?

My Answer: 

Oh, I hate this. I hate it. I hate it. I hate it. I sound a little like the bratty girl from Willy Wonka, but I hate this question. 

I like them both in their own rights for different reasons. I answered this question yesterday in the book tag, and my answer hasn’t changed. 

I LOVE having physical books. Touching them, the feel of well-worn pages, the smell. That will never get old to me. I will always love the feel of a real book in my hands…but I really like the ease I have with reading on my Kindle — in the dark! — and being able to take it everywhere without it being ruined by stuffing it in my bag. Plus, FREE books!

I do read more on my Kindle than physical copies, mainly because I’ve damaged too many books by stuffing them in my purse to take with me…and I can read my Kindle in the dark. 🙂 

Which is your preferred method of reading? Leave a comment with your response and your Friday Follow. 

Book Tag: Would You Rather? ….

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I saw this book tag at Beth’s Fuelled by Fiction and thought I’d share in as well!
1. Read only trilogies or stand alones?
I prefer stand alones, because there are so many trilogies and series out there it’s slightly ridiculous. I want to read and be done, usually, and move on to another book.
2. Read only female or male authors?
Ehhh. Probably female authors. It’s not that I’m sexist when it comes to reading, because I do want to read more male authors, but I predominately read female authors.
3. Shop at Barnes & Noble or Amazon?
Barnes & Noble is just too…pristine for my taste. I feel an overwhelming sense of OCD whenever I walk into one. I enjoy shopping on Amazon IF I have a giftcard. Otherwise, I do most of my browsing, perusing and purchasing at Half Price Books. It’s my kind of organized messy. I enjoy being with the books, touching them, reading the covers, leafing through shelves, going on the hunt for a book. I also love seeing parents fostering a love for reading with their children at the children’s corner. 🙂
4. All books become movies or t.v. shows?
Can I say neither? LOL. I guess movies. TV shows drag things out and add in additional things.
5. Read 5 pages per day or 5 books per week?
Really? Do we even need to go there? Hello, 5 books!
6. Be a professional reviewer or author?
Professional author. I have always loved both reading and writing, but I started dabbling heavily in writing for quite some time. I have left it hidden in the recesses of a notebook (and maybe some computer files, if they survived through 3 computers). I’m finally in a place where I can give myself to my writing in the way I need to, so I hope to get back to that. 🙂
7. Only read your top 20 favourite books over and over or always read new ones that you haven’t read before?
I will reread three of my favorites at various times (Outlander, Wild Bells to the Wild Sky, Looking for Alaska) when I feel the need, but I do need to read new books. I haven’t done a reread in at least 3 years, so I read newer books more than rereading.
8. Be a librarian or book seller?
Definitely librarian. People who come to the library do so because they have a love for books. Who better to talk to – and what better job to be able to read books – than a librarian?
9. Only read your favorite genre, or every genre except your favorite?
Umm…I can’t really say I have a favorite genre. I expanded my reading horizons and I enjoy several. I guess I’d say my favorite genre: fiction. Voila!
10. Only read physical books or eBooks?
Oh, please don’t do this to me! This question kills me every time. I LOVE having physical books. Touching them, the feel of well-worn pages, the smell. That will never get old to me. I will always love the feel of a real book in my hands…but I really like the ease I have with reading on my Kindle — in the dark! — and being able to take it everywhere without it being ruined by stuffing it in my bag. Plus, FREE books!

I don’t want to tag anyone and make you feel obligated, so this is a fun “do on your own” thing! If you’re a blogger and you’ve done this tag, I’d love it if you linked it in the comments! If you are a blogger and you decide to do this tag now, I’d love it if you linked it!

WWW Wednesdays (January 28)

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This is a weekly meme hosted by MizB @ Should Be Reading. To join in, click on the image above, and answer these three questions: 

What are you currently reading? 

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I am currently reading C.N. Crawford’s The Witching Elm. It is a unique blend of genres and historical time periods. I enjoyed reading and discussing The Crucible in high school about the Salem witch trials, and The Witching Elm brings in that component, along with a whole lot more.

Seventeen-year-old sorcerer Toby Corvin has single desire: to return to his girlfriend in Maremount, a world of talking ravens, ancient spells, and bone wardens.

There’s only one problem—he’s trapped in downtown Boston without the spell to get home.

After a violent civil war forced Toby into our world, he took refuge in Mather Academy, blending in as a high school student in a prestigious old boarding school. Within its creaky walls, he secretly plots to save his home.

But if anything can distract him from his mission, it’s his wild-haired and intriguing classmate Fiona. Of course, she has her own distractions with the rich and mysterious Jack.

When a ghostly army from Maremount descends upon Boston, Toby and Fiona must work together, racing desperately to stop the slaughter. In the process, they face unspeakable danger while unearthing dark secrets of New England’s past—a past that holds the key to saving both worlds from destruction.

What did you just finish reading?

I did not finish reading anything this week. 😦 Time is starting to get away from me! I need to kick it up a notch and get back on track.

What do you think you’ll read next?

Billy Bobble will be my next read, which I expect to be quick and humorous. After that I will jump straight to Just Pru by Anne Pfeffer.

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How about you? Have you read or TBRed any of these? What are you reading this week?

Leave a comment with your answers! Share your answers in the comments if you don’t have a blog OR the link to your WWW Wednesdays post. Happy Reading! 🙂

Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Books I’d Love to Read If I Had A Book Club

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Top Ten Tuesday is an original weekly meme feature created at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists. For the list of past topics and future schedule, click here.

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Ten Books I’d Love to Read…If I Had A Book Club

 

1. Outlander by Diana Gabaldon

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You should have seen this one coming if you’ve followed my blog for a while.

I have already read Outlander many, many times. With each re-reading, I discover something new or see something in a different light. Kind of like all the references in Disney movies you never caught as a child? I love to go back and find my favorite parts particular passages and re-read them. I can’t say favorite parts because, well, they ALL are favorites. This is my #1 favorite book of all time and I will push on anyone and everyone. (I apologize in advance if it is not your cup of tea.)

I would love to do a book club with this book. The historical references alone could feed several book club meetings, as well as the two time periods Claire has lived in during the novel. The storytelling is a level I have seen very rarely, with quite a range of characters.

 

2. The Help by Kathryn Stockett

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I know this one was a popular book club selection when the film came out a few years back. I do own the book, I just have not got around to reading it.

I can only imagine the rich discussions that a book club could have about The Help.  There could be discussions far after the book has been finished.

 

 

 

 

3. A Rose for the Crown by Anne Easter Smith

21062I read this one several years ago in college, paired with a book on the same topic. Here is the Goodreads synopsis:

Meet one of history’s alleged villains through the eyes of a captivating new heroine — the woman who was the mother of his illegitimate children, a woman who loved him for who he really was, no matter what the cost to herself.

As Kate Haute moves from her peasant roots to the luxurious palaces of England, her path is inextricably intertwined with that of Richard, Duke of Gloucester, later King Richard III. Although they could never marry, their young passion grows into a love that sustains them through war, personal tragedy, and the dangerous heights of political triumph.

Anne Easter Smith’s impeccable research provides the backbone of an engrossing and vibrant debut from a major new historical novelist.

 

4. One Thousand White Women: The Journals of May Dodd by Jim Fergus

33512I read this book last year. You can read my review here. The novel is told through a series of her notebooks, preserved by a monk and some of May Dodd’s descendants on the reservation.

This novel centers around the historical event of a peace conference in 1854, held at Ft. Laramie. A Cheyenne chief, Little Wolf, requests one thousand white women to be brides for his Cheyenne warriors, as their society is matrimonial. Children would belong to their mothers’ society – white man society. This was asked in hopes of assimilating the Cheyenne people, uniting two races, and creating peace. Of course, this request was met with a resounding no, and no white women ever were given to the Cheyennes as brides. However, Jim Fergus has written this novel and changed history: in his novel, the United States government sends the white women to marry into the Cheyenne tribes, and May Dodd is one of them. These are the first shipment of women to the Cheyenne, and quite quickly the US Government turns their back on the women sent to live in the wilds.

Again, the rich history of our country, not to mention the Cheyenne people and culture (my heritage!), would make for some fantastic discussions.

 

5. The Keeper of Dawn by J.B. Hickman

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I read J.B. Hickman’s debut novel the first year I started book blogging. You can read my review here. Just go read it. I don’t even have the words to describe this book, even two years later.

As I referenced in my review, which is one I consider to be my very best, there are so many ways to dive into this novel, the characters and the events…especially paralleled with other literary YA books, characters and events.

 

 

6. Monster by Walter Dean Myers

44184I read this several years ago in my adolescent literature course, required for me to teach middle school language arts.

I didn’t like the book at first. I hated it. I didn’t understand the way Myers organized the book, or Steve’s character.

BUT THEN. Oh, but then. Things exploded. This is a leading piece of literature that can still be used with discussions about young African Americans, particularly young men, and the role of the father figure in African American families.

 

7. Looking for Alaska by John Green

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I also read this one in my adolescent literature course, and it swiftly became a favorite.

This novel speaks volumes about the culture and pressures we are forcing onto our children as a collective, as well as teen suicide, but also suicide in general.

I am particularly interested in book club discussions revolving around Pudge and the Colonel’s driving need to retrace Alaska’s last steps, and the entire element of suicide. I know that can seem a bit morbid, but I read this book 6 months before my own cousin committed suicide. I don’t think I could have read Looking for Alaska for the first time after we lost Ricky, but since I had already read the novel, I found myself devouring particular passages in the following months.

 

8. The Paris Wife by Paula McLain

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This is a book that has been on my TBR – that I did buy at the time – after seeing a review from Emily as part of her virtual book club’s Literary Wives Series.

I’ve read a few of Ernest Hemingway’s pieces in high school and college, and as part of my junior and senior research projects I ended up with quite a bit of insight into Hemingway’s life, so this book fascinates me primarily for that reason. However, a book club – like Emily’s – could incorporate all manner of things into a book club discussion over this novel.

 

9. The Watsons Go To Birmingham by Christopher Paul Curtis

108077This is a novel I assigned to one of my student group book clubs last year for some of my lower level readers. I ended up reading a majority of the book with one of the groups in my smallest class. After finishing book club, we did watch the film. This is something I plan on doing again.

This book is set during such a controversial time in our history, an important time and turning point in our history, and this novel shows with clarity through the eyes of children what life was like in the South with Jim Crow laws.

 

 

10. BOMB: The Race to Build – and Steal – the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon by Steve Sheinkin

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This is a book I purchased last year for my classroom. I read quite a bit of in-depth pieces about this topic and time in history, and quite frankly, I felt like an idiot that I’d never learned any of this before, so I’d love to see this in book club. The synopsis from Goodreads:

In December of 1938, a chemist in a German laboratory made a shocking discovery: When placed next to radioactive material, a Uranium atom split in two. That simple discovery launched a scientific race that spanned 3 continents. In Great Britain and the United States, Soviet spies worked their way into the scientific community; in Norway, a commando force slipped behind enemy lines to attack German heavy-water manufacturing; and deep in the desert, one brilliant group of scientists was hidden away at a remote site at Los Alamos. This is the story of the plotting, the risk-taking, the deceit, and genius that created the world’s most formidable weapon. This is the story of the atomic bomb.

Most of these books are A) historical and B) re-reads for me. Did you find a similar make-up for your book club selections?

Did any of my books make your book club list? What were your choices? How many of them were some of your favorite reads?

Review: Candle in the Darkness

9457986Title: Candle in the Darkness
Author: Lynn Austin
Publisher: Razorbill
Release Date: November 2002
Length: 394 pages
Series?: Refiner’s Fire #1
Genre: Historical Christian Fiction

Find the book: Goodreads | Amazon

The daughter of a wealthy slave-holding family from Richmond, Virginia, Caroline Fletcher is raised in a culture that believes slavery is God-ordained and biblically acceptable. But upon awakening to the cruelty and injustice it encompasses, Caroline’s eyes are opened for the first time to the men and women who have cared tirelessly for her. Her journey of maturity and faith will draw her into the abolitionist movement, where she is confronted with the risks and sacrifices her beliefs entail.

***** Review *****

Caroline is like many children of the time – raised by slaves who support and run the Southern plantations and households. She has forged a bond with the people she sees day in and day out, who seem closer to her than her own parents.

Daddy was kind to me and brought me all sorts of treats…If I needed a man’s strong arms to hold me close and comfort me when I was upset, I ran to Eli.

Her mother is always cloistered away, upset and in moods. Caroline grows up hoping she doesn’t become what her mother has, and a burden to her future husband.

I once heard Ruby say that Mother had “lost” her baby, and I worried for the longest time that Mother would lose me, too.

Caroline doesn’t see the institution and nuances of slavery as Southerners do. She sees it through the eyes of a humanitarian: what is wrong and right, simply based on human feeling and emotion. She sees the injustices of slavery, and even though she is Southern, she doesn’t support it, but she can’t outright deny or criticize it, either.

After a series of events, Caroline is sent to live with relatives in the North, where she becomes involved in abolitionist movements. She spends two years of her life in the North while her father is away. She returns to the South and struggles with the life she must continue to lead. Things start changing drastically as events lead up to cession and the Civil War.

I enjoyed how Caroline’s life after returning to the South followed and focused on the events leading up to the Civil War, with accuracy and detail.

This novel is written is such a unique way. It is Caroline’s accounting of the story, that is one day given to her fiance. It is the last bit that she has to hold on to a drastically changing life, and one she cannot see the future of.

I need to explain why I’ve done what I have done, to tell my story in my own words before it’s told by those who won’t understand. They will surely call me a traitor and a murderer, and I suppose I am both of those things. I have betrayed people who trusted me. My involvement with certain events in Libby Prison has led to accusations of moral improprieties, but as God is my witness, I am innocent of those charges. Even so, people will believe what they choose to believe. And when a host of vicious rumors is added to the list of my misdeeds, I’m not sure anyone will ever understand why I’ve acted the way I have.

What Caroline survives on is Eli’s encouragement and her faith. Eli repeatedly helps Caroline see that it’s not her way, but God’s way…and God’s time. I generally do not like preachy books, but this one wasn’t so bad. I didn’t feel preached to – I clearly felt Eli was mentoring and nurturing Caroline.

I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the Civil War time period.

***** About the Author *****

39788For many years, Lynn Austin nurtured a desire to write but frequent travels and the demands of her growing family postponed her career. When her husband’s work took Lynn to Bogota, Colombia, for two years, she used the B.A. she’d earned at Southern Connecticut State University to become a teacher. After returning to the U.S., the Austins moved to Anderson, Indiana, Thunder Bay, Ontario, and later to Winnipeg, Manitoba.

It was during the long Canadian winters at home with her children that Lynn made progress on her dream to write, carving out a few hours of writing time each day while her children napped. Lynn credits her early experience of learning to write amid the chaos of family life for her ability to be a productive writer while making sure her family remains her top priority.

Extended family is also very important to Austin, and it was a lively discussion between Lynn, her mother, grandmother, and daughter concerning the change in women’s roles through the generations that sparked the inspiration for her novel Eve’s Daughters.

Along with reading, two of Lynn’s lifelong passions are history and archaeology. While researching her Biblical fiction series, Chronicles of the Kings, these two interests led her to pursue graduate studies in Biblical Backgrounds and Archaeology through Southwestern Theological Seminary. She and her son traveled to Israel during the summer of 1989 to take part in an archaeological dig at the ancient city of Timnah. This experience contributed to the inspiration for her novel Wings of Refuge.

Find the author: Website | Facebook | Goodreads

Sunday Post (January 25)

Sunday PostThe Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimba @ Caffeinated Book Reviewer. It’s a chance to share news, a post to recap the past week on your blog, showcase books and things received, and share news about what is coming up on the blog for the week ahead. To get in on the Sunday funday, see the rules here: Sunday Post Meme.  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This week was hustle and bustle. I forgot to write a review, and I have put the blog on the back burner a bit. There is so much going on in real life, and when I get home the last thing I want to do is check in. 😦 For this reason, there is not much of anything besides memes happening next week, hence the disappearance of this section for this edition of The Sunday Post.

There are some good things going on that I can’t quite share yet, but I really really want to. 🙂

~ Last Week on G1000W ~

~ Around Town in the Spotlight ~

Feature Follow Friday (January 23)

Alison Can Read Feature & FollowIt is the Friday Feature Follow!

This is a weekly blog meme hosted by Parajunkee’s View and Alison Can Read.

Here are the general rules to Follow Friday:
1. Follow the Follow My Book Blog Friday Hosts (links above) and any one else you want to follow on the list
2. Follow our Featured Bloggers
3. Put your Blog name & URL in the Linky thing.
4. Grab the button up there and place it in a post, this post is for people to find a place to say hi in your comments
5. Follow Follow Follow as many as you can
6. If someone comments and says they are following you, be a dear and follow back. Spread the Love…and the followers
7. If you want to show the link list, just follow the link below the entries and copy and paste it within your post!
8. If your new to the follow Friday hop, comment and let me know, so I can stop by and check out your blog!
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The Question:

Do you post your reviews anywhere besides your blog? Where else do you post reviews?  A Great Read

My Answer: 

I do post my reviews other places. I cross-post reviews to Goodreads and Amazon…usually months later. I am really bad about cross-posting. It’s one of those blogging housekeeping tasks that I get around to when I think about it. For example, at the beginning of January I was updating all my cross-posting with reviews all the way back to the beginning of October. :/

Do you cross-post your reviews? Leave a comment with your response and your Friday Follow.